Photography

About MO

Monique Tarée was born far away from the Caribbean, in the city of Amsterdam. 

As a publisher and photographer of Dutch high-end magazines she worked, traveled and dove in Eilat, Sharm el Sheikh, the south of France, Bonaire, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique and finally Roatan, Honduras.   In Roatan,  Monique fell madly in love with the ocean. So she decided to turn her hobby into her job. She has been ‘recreational’ diving since the 90's and working as a PADI dive instructor since 2009.

Over the years, her passion for the ocean evolved into pure exploration of the underwater world. A self-taught person, with an artistic eye she began her underwater photography with a compact camera Sony RX100 in 2015.  She takes the natural beauty underwater and creates depth of field and sharpness to each piece with the mix of light and angle to create a "magical" shot. Diving for her is much more like meditation. She loves to share the wonders of the sea with her friends and dive buddies.

Being underwater is a unique opportunity to see the nature as ‘art’

As a dive intructor she also teaches the basics about the underwater photography. Helping students create thousands of beautiful images of the underwater world and show them how to get better pictures with their own camera is what she likes to do.

She leads private dive expeditions and is also available for photo assignments. Not just for underwater but also on land. Please don’t hesitate to contact her if you would like to know more about trips, photography and prices.

Monique has lived in Roatan with her family for 8 years. All her photographs are from the Island Roatan.

Roatán is the largest and most developed island of the Bay Islands of Honduras. Long and thin (50km long, but only 2km to 4km wide), the island is a real diving and snorkeling mecca – virtually its entire coastline is fringed by an astonishingly diverse coral reef teeming with tropical fish.

On land, exquisite white-sand beaches like West Bay, a mountainous interior of pine-forested hills and the remote wild east of the island (once a pirate hangout) beg to be explored.” Lonely Planet